Sumerian Mists (Part 3 of 3)

Firstly, an image that shows the Cosmos according to the Sumerian mythology:

cosmologia_sumera

There is written, from top to bottom:

Primordial Sea (Nammu)
Sky (An)
Terrestrial Ocean (Abzu)
Earth (Ki)
Hell (Kur)
Primordial Sea (Nammu)

The Primordial Sea (Nammu) is the Universe: uncreated, eternal and infinite, enclosing the creatress matter of all that will come into being, primeval amniotic fluid that has given form to all that has been, that is and that will be. The Earth (Ki) is the plane/circle passing through the Ecliptic, and the Zodiac surrounding it. The Terrestrial Ocean (Abzu) is the “whirlpool” produced by the orbits of the planets of the Solar System. The Sky (An) is the Starry Sky above the Solar System. Hell (Kur: another proof that the Kur of which I speak in my previous article is indeed the burial mound/realm of the dead) is the Starry Sky below the Solar System.

***

Finally, the known myth about Baldr’s death: the dreams premonitory of his death, the oath imposed to all living creatures to not harm him, the deities that jokingly try to harm him knowing his invulnerability, his eventual death at the hands of Höðr, the search in Hel to bring him back and the cry of all the living and dead creatures to allow his return in the world of the living.

Baldr’s death:
baldr_lies_dead

The Sumerian mythology contains a poem, called “The Dream of Dumuzi”, strikingly similar in many ways to Baldr’s myth summarized above. In this poem the god Dumuzi has premonitions of his destiny, through dreams that shows his imminent death. He knows he will be killed by a band of brigands but hopes nevertheless to avoid the inevitable and asks all the creatures of nature to cry for him. On several occasions the god is captured by the brigands, but manages to escape. At the end he seeks refuge in a pen in the desert but the brigands capture him and destiny is fulfilled. After the death of Dumuzi follows the ritualistic lamentation and Geshtinanna – his sister – starts looking for him in the realm of death, finally succeeding in bringing him back to life.

The similarities with the myth of Baldr’s death are many: already the title of the poem reminds of the “Baldrs Draumar” (“Dreams of Baldr”), then we have the premonitions of death during sleep, the attempt to avoid death, the participation of all living creatures, the fulfillment of destiny despite the efforts to avoid it, and the final search in the realm of death to bring the god back to life. We can quite easily make a parallel between the deities trying repeatedly to harm Baldr, until his eventual death, and the brigands that capture more times Dumuzi without being able to kill him, until when they finally succeed in their purpose.

Other equivalent myths are those about the resurrections of Osiris and Lemminkäinen. In the Egyptian mythology, Seth kills Osiris and dismembers his body into fourteen parts, to then scatter them throughout Egypt. Isis then collects all the body parts and reassembles them, in this way bringing back to life Osiris. In the Kalevala, Lemminkäinen goes to Tuonela – the realm of death – to pass a test and win in this way his future wife, but is killed and his body torn to pieces and thrown into the infernal river. Then the mother of Lemminkäinen descends into the underworld and recovers all the parts of his son’s body, reassembles the corpse and brings it back to life.

Lemminkäinen is brought back to life by his mother:
lemminkaisenaiti

Baldr, Dumuzi, Osiris and Lemminkäinen all represent the dead Sun that returns to life after the Winter Solstice (to then increase its brightness up until the Summer Solstice) and the child that, after completing the initiation ritual, comes out from the burial mound, he too reborn at the dawn of Winter Solstice/Yule.

Höðr, Seth and the other entities that kill the Sun God are manifestations of Autumn and Winter, the seasons when – respectively – the Sun grows old and dies.

These comparisons prove even more the fact that the European Religion is born from our blood! The only way our enemies have to destroy it is to exterminate us till the last! The Jews, the Christians and all their lackeys will fail miserably, as always! Eternity is written in our destiny!

61

Part 1: Sumerian Mists (Part 1 of 3)
Part 2: Sumerian Mists (Part 2 of 3)

Advertisements

When Trees don’t fear Death

Many European Traditionalists love to read books. We read to try to know and understand our past, our ancestors, our traditions, our history and in one sentence: who we are mentally, physically and spiritually. Not least, also to avoid this modern world so unnatural and just not made for us: it is made for the totally domesticated man.

Here I want to share with you a list of essential books that you should read to understand who you really are:

MYTHOLOGY AND FAIRY TALES:

Apollodorus of Athens – Bibliotheca.

Homer – Iliad, – Odyssey.

Apollonius Rhodius – Argonautica.

Ovid – Metamorphoses.

Virgil – Aeneid.

Snorri Sturluson – Prose Edda.

The Poetic Edda.

The Kalevala.

The Egyptian Book of the Dead.

The Epic of Gilgamesh.

The Táin Bó Cúailnge.

The Mabinogion.

The Matter of Britain.

All European Fairy Tales – (Grimm, Andersen, Pitré…).

Marie Cachet – The Secret of the She-Bear.

Varg Vikernes – Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia, – Reflections on European Mythology and Polytheism.

Richard B. Onians – The Origins of European Thought.

James G. Frazer – The Golden Bough.

Vladimir Propp – The Historical Roots of Fairy Tales.

Arnold Van Gennep – The Rites of Passage.

Carlo Ginzburg – Ecstasies.

Massimo Conese – Nati con la Camicia.

Károly Kerényi – The Heroes and Gods of the Greeks, – Nel Labirinto.

Robert Graves – The Greek Myths.

Gianna Chiesa Isnardi – I Miti Nordici.

Andrea Verdecchia – I Miti Italici.

Massimo Dall’Agnola – Mitologia e Dèi dell’Antico Egitto.

Mircea Eliade – Patterns in Comparative Religion, – A History of Religious Ideas.

Julius Evola – Revolt Against the Modern World, – The Mystery of the Grail, – The Hermetic Tradition, – The Metaphysics of Sex.

Mario Polia – Il Mistero Imperiale del Graal.

Philippe Walter – Artù, – Christian Mythology.

Giorgio De Santillana – Hamlet’s Mill.

Nuccio D’Anna – Il Gioco Cosmico.

WESTERN PHILOSOPHY:

Heraclitus – Fragments.

Parmenides – On the Order of Nature.

Plato – Dialogues.

Epictetus – The Enchiridion.

Marcus Aurelius – Meditations.

Seneca – Letters from a Stoic, – Dialogues.

Enrico Berti – In Principio era la Meraviglia.

Erwin Rohde – Psyche.

Pierre Hadot – The Inner Citadel, – The Veil of Isis.

Marie Cachet – Le Besoin d’Impossible.

EASTERN PHILOSOPHY:

The Bhagavadgītā.

The Zhuangzi.

The Tao Te Ching.

PREHISTORY AND HISTORY:

B.G. Tilak – La Dimora Artica nei Veda.

Jean Manco – Ancestral Journeys.

Mirella Cipolloni Sampò – Dolmen.

Gualtiero Ciola – Noi, Celti e Longobardi.

Michel Pastoureau – Medioevo Simbolico.

Military History: The Definitive Visual Guide to the Objects of Warfare.

MODERN WORLD:

Corneliu Z. Codreanu – For My Legionaries.

Oswald Spengler – The Decline of the West.

Julius Evola – Ride the Tiger, – Men Among the Ruins.

Réne Guénon – The Crisis of the Modern World.

Nico Merz – The Awakening of Europeans.

George Orwell – 1984.

FANTASY:

J.R.R. Tolkien – The Hobbit, – The Lord of the Rings, – The Silmarillion.

Robert E. Howard – Conan the Barbarian.

Hurry up, before they are censored!

bambina-su-un-librobambini-e-libri